Archive

Archive for August, 2009

Peer review

The process by which a book publisher or journal subjects a scholarly work intended for publication to the scrutiny of others who are experts in the same field.

(See the two blog posts below for a much fuller exploration of this subject.)

I am surprised and disconcerted to see that this term is not defined in the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in two posts, one on peer review and its alternatives, the other on peer review and academic credibility as barriers to self-publishing.

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Open Access

An increasingly popular idea that the results of publicly funded research should be published as e-content and made freely available via the Internet for purposes of education and research (implicitly but not necessarily straight after publication). Open access does not mean that laws of copyright and the principles of fair dealing are suspended, nor is this the same thing as open source publishing.

Creative Commons relies on the Open Access movement for much of its raison d’être.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Copyright

This is literally the ‘right to copy’ an original work in a particular format. Normally, the author retains moral rights in the work but signs over to the publisher those publication rights whose formats or usage are covered by the author contract (usually full copyright in the work). On the expiry of its copyright protection, a work enters the public domain.

Copyright is very much under attack today for becoming an outmoded way of registering and protecting rights to creative works in the digital age. An alternative ‘copyleft’ movement, Creative Commons, is gaining ground but copyright remains the bedrock of publishing (and all other creative industries) today.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Wiki

Website or similar online resource with word-processing functionalities that allows users to add, change and delete content collectively, Wikipedia being the best known example.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Web 2.0

Perceived second generation of the Web with new functionalities (social networking sites, wikis, blogs, tagging/reviewing tools, etc.) that enhance and emphasize online collaboration and sharing among users.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Social networking

Key characteristic of the Web 2.0 revolution, this involves chatting, messaging, file sharing, blogging and other forms of interaction between communities of people who share interests and activities. Social networking websites are being used by millions of people everyday and increasingly are recognized by marketeers as a new channel for promotion.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Self-publishing

The publishing of books and other works by their authors, rather than by established, third-party publishers. While self-publishers assume the financial risk of publication, bearing the cost of manufacturing and of selling their own book, they also retain all net sales income. Self-publishing is a feature of new, collaborative forms of authorship (e.g. open source publishing). To date, however, self-published academic works have a low status among scholars, institutions and funding authorities, mainly because they tend not to be peer reviewed before publication.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on the rise of self-publishing.

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