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Archive for September, 2009

Author proofs

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

Output from typesetting in the form of page proofs sent to the author for checking (a matching copy will likely be sent to the publisher for simultaneous checking). It is common for authors to receive two sets of proofs: first proofs and second (or final) proofs. Today the author may not receive a hard copy but instead gets a PDF of these proofs, which are not the same as printer’s proofs.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Release date

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

The date on which a new book is first supplied to retail customers. Some books, mainly at the trade end of the spectrum, have globally or regionally co-ordinated release dates, which means that outlets (wholesale and retail) that receive stock early are subject to an embargo on selling before the release date.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on setting the copyright date.

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Copyright notice

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

Line on the copyright page stating who owns the copyright and the date of ownership. If a book appears after the end of September, publishers often put the next year’s date here as it may be months before the book is actually available around the world; in so doing, they avoid having a book on its release date looking like last year’s book.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Publication date

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

(1) The publication year, essentially the date on the copyright notice. (2) The planned, actual release date.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Back orders

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

Orders received and recorded for a published title that is (temporarily) unavailable, i.e. not out of print. Sometimes conflated with advance orders.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Advance orders

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

Orders for a book received and recorded prior to publication, also called ‘dues’. Publishers hope to build enough advance orders so that their release, when stock is first delivered to the warehouse, will cover the printing bill. Sometimes conflated with back orders.

However, publishers (and their authors!) need to be wary that actual publication is not too long after the announced publication date. Some retailers and library suppliers automatically cancel their orders after (say) 90 days have elapsed.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Availability

September 30, 2009 Leave a comment

An important status indicator for the book trade, the most satisfying one for a publisher probably being ‘Available’. Three common notations for unavailable titles are ‘Not Yet Published’, ‘(Temporarily) Out of Stock’ and ‘Out of Print’.

While publishers may be happy to build up advance orders and back orders for a title, some online retailers refuse to take orders for a book (or even list it) unless copies are actually available (i.e. its status is ‘available’).

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

Categories: Uncategorized