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Archive for January, 2010

Bit-mapped

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

(1) B/W format using black or white pixels only. While there are no gray shadings, a grayscale effect can be obtained by dithering or other types of halftone screening.

(2) See Rasterize(d).

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on image problems.

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B/W (or B&W)

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

Black and white (of illustrations), printed in black and tints of black only. Such images have a grayscale format (not a bit-mapped one). See also Colour.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Grayscale

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

A B/W format using black, white and gray shades produced as tints of black.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Halftone

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

A grayscale image or other object whose (unprintable) continuous tones are down-sampled via screening into a pattern of various-sized printable dots barely visible to the eye. There are different types of screening (e.g., dithering), each with their own pattern.

Their nature is why scanning a halftone illustration from a printed source gives a far inferior result as opposed to scanning the original photographic illustration; because the path of the scan cannot follow/match the pattern of dots, you get a blotchy rather than a smooth result.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Rasterize(d)

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

(1) Process of converting an image to a bit-mapped format from a vector-based format like EPS or from a mixed format like PDF.

(2). Graphics format based on dots (i.e. it is bit-mapped). Such images (e.g. halftones) differ from vector-based images in that they allow subtle variations of colour/tint but can only be scaled by resampling the dots. Repetitively resampled images quickly degrade in quality.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

Categories: Uncategorized

Tint

January 31, 2010 2 comments

Colour tone incorporating a solid colour and a certain percentage of white. For instance, a certain pale shade of blue might be expressed as 50% cyan, its CMYK profile being C=50, M=0, Y=0, K=0.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

Categories: Uncategorized

Vector-based

January 31, 2010 Leave a comment

Also object-oriented. Graphical format based on objects (lines, squares, circles, etc.) whose properties are defined by the Postscript computer language. These are infinitely scaleable without distortion or degradation. All modern fonts are vector-based. As opposed to rasterized.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on image problems.

Categories: Uncategorized