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Archive for June, 2010

Spot colour

June 16, 2010 2 comments

(1) Printed colours created with specially mixed inks rather than by over-printing with CMYK colours (process printing). In fact, spot colours can be used very effectively in addition to process printing, e.g. over-printing an ordinary four-colour cover with a extra spot colour (say, with a luminous, transparent ink that simulates rain-drops).

(2) The use of one additional colour on the book page in addition to the normal black.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

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Duotone

June 16, 2010 1 comment

Typically, overprinting with black and one spot colour to create an economical colour cover. This practice is disappearing as the cost of four-colour printing is falling below that of manually setting up a printer with the inks for spot colour.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

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Colour separation

June 16, 2010 1 comment

Full-colour (usually four-colour) printing first requires separation of the four CMYK primary colours on to separate printing plates, one plate per process colour. On each plate, the pure colour value is reproduced as black, while tints of that colour are reproduced as gray.

In the illustration below, you can see how a variety of colours are separated. Note that the rich-red word “RED” vanishes into the gray background on the cyan plate. This is because the red and gray used have similar cyan percentages. On the magenta and yellow plates, the word is completely black because its colour is 100% magenta and 100% yellow. In contrast, because the red used for RED has no black in its colour definition, on the black plate the word is reversed out (appears as white, the absence of colour).

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

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Four-colour printing

June 16, 2010 4 comments

Reproduction of colour by the overprinting of the four CMYK primary colours, a process first requiring that the colours are separated as their own plates are required for the different process colours. See also Duotone.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

Categories: Uncategorized

Process colours

June 16, 2010 1 comment

The three primary printing colours (cyan, magenta and yellow) used in combination with black in four-colour printing. As opposed to spot colours. See also CMYK.

Colours are defined by their process colour code. For example, the reddest of the web-safe red colours has a CMYK code of 0-92-100-0 (no cyan, a 92% tint of magenta, pure yellow and no black).

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

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Origination

June 15, 2010 1 comment

(1) The work and cost involved in producing a book up to the point of manufacture, including editing, design, typesetting, proofing and indexing (but excluding marketing, which is a cost of sales).

(2) Sometimes conflated with pre-press work.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

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Camera-ready copy (CRC)

June 15, 2010 1 comment

The finalized typeset book pages (or sometimes finished artwork) ready for delivery to the printer. Originally this was delivered as hard copy that was manually filmed, hence the name. Today, when authors produce their own CRC, this is usually delivered as a PDF file; direct filming is now rare.

Publishers are usually wise enough to avoid publishing books based on CRC from the author. Any cost saving on the typesetting is usually outweighed by vastly higher supervisory costs involved in hand-holding the author and ensuring that the CRC is usable.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on pre-press processes at a printing works.

Categories: Uncategorized