Archive

Archive for the ‘Typography’ Category

Open Type fonts

Scalable computer fonts conforming to the ISO open standard on typography and which can be used across computer platforms. Open Type fonts are now produced by virtually all type foundries and are available for a myriad of alphabets and scripts.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on issues with fonts and diacritical marks.

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Categories: Typography

Font

(1) In common usage (and how it is used both in our book and in my Getting Published blog), a typeface/type family. (2) More properly, the full set of characters of a typeface in a specific style (indeed, in earlier times, with specific weights), e.g. Baskerville semibold italic. A key feature of the digital revolution in publishing has been the huge advances in typographical design, not least the development of Open Type fonts.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on issues with fonts and diacritical marks.

Categories: Typography

Diacritical marks

Accents and other modifiers to the standard roman alphabet, in earlier times (before modern Open Type fonts) often detested by publishers for the difficulty of typesetting these correctly.

(An extended discussion on diacritical marks begins at the blog post stated below.)

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on issues with fonts and diacritical marks.

Categories: Typography