Spine

November 9, 2010 3 comments

The back of a book (not the same as the back cover). This is the book face along which the book block is bound to the cover. Shelved books are usually stored spine out today but in much earlier times books were shelved spine inwards.

This definition is new, i.e. it is not extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on bookbinding.

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Perfect binding

November 9, 2010 1 comment

A form of binding where the gathered signatures of a book are trimmed along their spine edge, gashed or notched then this roughened edge is glued to the inside spine of the cover. Thereafter the other sides of the book block and cover are trimmed to their final size. This binding is typical for paperbacks and has a shorter lifespan than sewn binding because glue becomes brittle and breaks over time. In contrast, the thread used in a sewn binding can last a century or more..

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on bookbinding.

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Library binding

November 9, 2010 Leave a comment

High-quality sewn binding, usually of a hardback book, using more durable materials. However, the squeeze on library budgets has caused some libraries to opt for cheap paperbacks instead (where these are available), the calculation being that, if the first cheap paperback falls apart, a second copy can be bought (and, later, even a third). The accumulated cost is still less than the cost of buying a book (or rebinding it) with a library binding.

This definition is extracted (and expanded on) from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on bookbinding.

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Book block

November 9, 2010 3 comments

The printed pages of the book that have been folded, gathered and sewn in readiness for the actual binding.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on bookbinding.

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Press

November 9, 2010 1 comment

(1) Printing press, a machine. (2) Printing company. (3) Publishing house.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup.

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Printer

November 9, 2010 1 comment

(1) An enterprise (normally a separate company or publisher’s department) that provides (usually commercial) printing services, often also offering typesetting and bookbinding services.
(2) Loosely, the premises of such an enterprise (a printing works) or the place where the printing presses are actually located (the print-shop).
(3) A person owning or running such an enterprise.
(4) Someone qualified in the printing trade or whose occupation is printing (e.g. operating a printing press).
(5) An output device (usually connected to a computer or computer network) that prints ‘hard copy’ of computer files, reports, etc. onto paper and other physical print media.

This definition is new, i.e. it is not extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on printers.

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Slip case

November 9, 2010 Leave a comment

An open box inside which sits one or more volumes (usually hardbacks). The hard outer case is cloth covered or is a printed paper case. This protects the book(s) within and makes the whole product look classy and expensive.

This definition is extracted from the book Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences by Gerald Jackson and Marie Lenstrup. It was first referred to in the blog Getting Published in a post on bookbinding.

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